In the Fulani village of Hore Mondji, located in southern Mauritania,, a women's cooperative uses solar energy to operate the borehole that supplies water to the market garden.

Visualizing Climate Change collection launches on 29 September.

Access the collection and stay up to date by:

1.  Registering at  Climate Visuals  for  download permissions

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Visualizing Climate Change: An Open Call for Photography

Together, Climate Visuals and TED Countdown are releasing 100 photographs that showcase climate solutions alongside the global impact of climate change. The images were selected from more than 5,500 unique submissions from professional and amateur, gender-balanced photographers - spanning more than 150 countries. 

The images are freely available to key groups communicating on climate - namely the editorial media, educators, campaigners and non-for-profit groups - via the Climate Visuals library. 

Traditional forest management without heavy machinery and intensive agriculture, Tibesh mountains, Romania.

“We’re so incredibly grateful, proud, and excited about the submissions received and embodied in our judge’s final selections”, said Toby Smith, Climate Visuals Programme Lead. “The images portray diverse climate solutions, new narratives and voices, and impactful photography—all direct from communities around the world. We reached over 5.2 million individuals in our Open Call in June. However, the real impact starts now as the entire collection becomes accessible to climate communicators.”

The initiative was catalysed by a $100,000 creative fund, with $1,000 per image selected - used to build a new robust, accessible collection of evidence-based photos that document the reality of climate change around the world. Images were selected that communicate positive climate solutions in five key areas, whilst ensuring they are both illustrative and impactful.

TED Countdown Themes

Photography brief and collection aims:

The visual narratives in circulation must move from illustrating climate causes and impacts to climate justice, solutions and positive change. Our online submission and licensing process considered a broad range of diversity, equity and inclusion factors to ensure that this opportunity was global, accessible, fair, representative, illustrative and impactful. The collection provides both a platform, voice and now visual tools to people and communities not yet represented in the mainstream climate change narrative.  

Qeqertaq Arnatassiaq and Niels Molgard push an iceberg near shore of Greenland so that it doesn't drag down their fishing nets.

‘Visualizing Climate Change: An Open Call for Photography’ is supporting climate change photographers, educators, communicators and campaigners by the creation of a new free-to-access collection of the world’s most impactful photography.

Read the full photography brief and image examples - all based on our research into people’s response to climate change imagery as well as  insights developed across our practical partnerships and projects.

Visualizing Climate Change collection launches on 29 September.

Access the collection and stay up to date by:

1.  Registering at  Climate Visuals  for  download permissions

2.  Opt-in to our newsletter for the latest announcements

3.  Follow us on TwitterInstagram for news and sneak previews

The final 100 images have all been selected by an independent jury, with every image in the collection receiving at least 2 votes and many receiving 4 or more votes.

 

Images submitted to our open call all: 

    • Fulfill the guidance of our full photographic brief and represent elements of the  Climate Visuals principles best-practice
    • Represent one or more of the Countdown themes as a single image 
    • Interpret guidance and themes broadly with visual and cultural diversity
    • Include a majority of images depicting climate change solutions 
    • Include a minority of images depicting  causes and impacts 
    • Provide a global sense of people, place,  geographic and cultural context 
    • Show solutions and narratives across all sizes, scale and reach
    • Document realistic well-known solutions, but also reveal new, innovative ideas
    • Show a human connection to technology, infrastructure or geography
    • Consider related or inter-related topics such as environmental justice and the role of business
    • Consider the people, places, communities, sectors and areas of society that are not normally featured in the media or climate change conversations
    • Illustrate a broader story, rather than focus on a small individual detail of it

Visualizing Climate Change collection launches on 29 September.

Access the collection and stay up to date by:

1.  Registering at  Climate Visuals  for  download permissions

2.  Opt-in to our newsletter for the latest announcements

3.  Follow us on TwitterInstagram for news and sneak previews

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